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Description

Abstract: Prompt and efficient access to clinical data, regardless of its source, is one of the key promises of electronic health record technology as EHRs approach universal adoption in the United States. But in the nation's complex and fragmented health care system, that goal requires interoperability and health information exchange across disparate information systems and business entities. In this panel, experts from academia and industry explore whether the U.S. healthcare system is now finally nearing the objective of broad-based technical and organizational interoperability for health data or still struggling against formidable barriers that have frustrated past interoperability initiatives. The panel presentations and discussion will assess the current state of interoperability and health information exchange (IHIE), as well as the potential contributions of contemporary IHIE initiatives, such as the FHIR standards and the Carequality and CommonWell industry consortia, to advance IHIE. The speakers will demystify these initiatives, highlight their novel attributes, and identify their remaining limitations in delivering on the promise of interoperability and health information exchange, including lessons learned from personal experience. The discussion will engage the audience and explore specific actions that informatics and health I.T. stakeholders can take to advance interoperability and HIE goals.

Learning Objective 1: Review the goals of clinical data interoperability and health information exchange and characterize the current state of interoperability and exchange from an empirical and realistic perspective.

Learning Objective 2: Analyze several contemporary technology efforts to advance IHIE, including the FHIR standards and the Carequality and CommonWell industry consortia, with a particular emphasis on what may be new and different in these efforts versus similar to past unsuccessful approaches.

Learning Objective 3: Describe the primary remaining challenges to achieving true interoperability and health information exchange based on applied research and the experiences and lessons learned from a specific health information exchange organization.

Learning Objective 4: Highlight the most important actions that can be taken by the medical informatics and health information technology communities to accelerate progress today.

Authors:

Walter Sujansky (Presenter)
Sujansky & Associates, LLC

Julia Adler-Milstein (Presenter)
University of California, San Francisco

Ross Martin (Presenter)
Chesapeake Regional Information System for our Patients

Presentation Materials:

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